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Jul 012017
 

 

A church with conservative services
reaching people for Christ and His kingdom.
7271 Muncaster Mill Road
Rockville, Maryland 20855
301-670-1971
Dr. Frederick W. Carroll, Pastor

September 2017

Dear Friends:

Have you ever thought about how gracious the Lord is to each of us, each and every day of our lives. Consider some verses from God’s precious book to us, the Holy Bible: This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him, and saved him out of all his troubles (Psalm 34:6). I am poor and needy; yet the Lord thinketh on me (Psalm 40:17). O LORD, hear me: for I am poor and needy (Psalm 86:1). But I am poor and needy: make haste unto me, O God, Thou art my help and my deliverer; O LORD, make no tarrying (Psalm 70:5). For I am poor and needy, and my heart is wounded within me. Help me, O LORD my God: O save me according to Thy mercy (Psalm 109:22, 26). Then there are our Lord’s words in the Sermon on the Mount: Blessed are the poor in spirit (Matthew 5:3).

Oswald Chambers reminds us that “the Lord’s teachings apply only to His disciples.” Are you truly a “blood washed” believer in the Lord Jesus Christ as your personal Savior from death and hell. One of the blessings of being truly saved is that the Lord is always watching out for us. His grace is always enough for me and for you. Remember the Lord’s words to Paul when he prayed for relief from a thorn in the flesh in 2 Corinthians 12:7–10. God spoke to Paul and reminded him My grace is sufficient for thee: for my strength is made perfect in weakness.

Look at Paul’s words in 2 Corinthians 9:8 And God is able to make all grace abound toward you; that ye, always having all sufficiency in all things, may abound to every good work: I like the footnote on this verse in the Ryrie Study Bible: “God will supply the generous giver with enough to meet his own needs and enough to give to every good work.” Did you notice the alls in this Bible verse—all grace, always (that is at all times), all sufficiency, all things.

Let us go back to Matthew 5:3 Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of God. This is what William MacDonald has to say on this verse in the Believer’s Bible Commentary: “This first blessing is pronounced on the poor in spirit. This does not refer to natural disposition, but to one’s deliberate choice and discipline. The poor in spirit are those who acknowledge their own helplessness (Note all the verses at the beginning of this letter—how about you? do you acknowledge your personal helplessness?) and rely on God’s omnipotence. They sense their spiritual need and find it supplied in the Lord.”

Relying on our Savior’s omnipotence (having unlimited power or authority; all powerful—dictionary). We need to realize that our God is all-powerful and able to do whatever He wills and whatever is consistent with His nature.

Are you living by faith in an all-powerful God? Or do you carry the weight of the world as if God were not powerful? Remember dear reader, “Nothing is too difficult for God.” The angel’s question in Genesis 18:14 was “Is any thing too hard for the Lord?” No. Nothing is too hard for our wonderful Lord. Let us remember that this month.

Trusting my wonderful Savior,

Rev. Frederick W. Carroll, Th.D.
Pastor

Jul 012017
 

July 2017

Dear Friends,

Here is a little bit of history for you: On July 4, 1863, during the War Between the States, Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia was defeated after a charge of 15,000 Confederate soldiers failed to break the Union lines held under George Meade at Gettysburg,  The three-day battle, culminated by Pickett’s Charge, resulted in the Confederacy losing one-third of their troops, and the Union seeing 23,049 casualties out of their total 88,289 fighting men.

As we celebrate Independence Day in July, we need to remember that freedom comes with a cost—the high cost of human lives. Even more importantly, the cost of spiritual freedom from sin for us, cost the Lord Jesus Christ His life on the cross of Calvary to suffer and die for our sins (see Matthew 1:21; John 1:29; 1 John 3:5; and Galatians 5:1).

This month also is a milestone in my life as I reach the mature age of 75 years. Thinking of that, I want to share with you some Bible verses that have blessed and encouraged my soul. Psalm 71:9, Cast me not off in the time of old age, forsake me not when my strength faileth. The psalmist pleads, one commentator says, “that God may not find him a burden.”  How could our wonderful Lord ever consider us a burden when He died for us (John 3:16) and “ever liveth to make intercession” for each of His born again children (Hebrews 7:25).   [You that are younger than I, will one day be old. Be encouraged by these verses.]  We can be quite sure that God’s strength is made perfect in weakness (2 Corinthians 12:9) and that He will never abandon a person just because he is old. Our society does, but not the Lord. God has a great liking for old people, for which I am truly thankful.

Next consider Psalm 37:25, The Lord knoweth the days of the upright: and their inheritance shall be for ever.  John Phillips states: “David had never seen the righteous abandoned by God and any temporary shifts of fortune had all been part of the wise discipline of God to make of him a true man of God.” I add to those comments the testimony of a life that has always been sustained by the grace and mercy of my wonderful Savior. Dear reader let this verse bring strength to your soul as you travel through this life.

Now consider Psalm 71:18, Now also when I am old and greyheaded, O God, forsake me not: until I have shewed thy strength unto this generation, and thy power to every one that is to come. Each year, I choose a verse to consider and practice for that year. This verse was my verse for 2009. For this unnamed old writer of the psalm (and the writer of this letter) the passionate appeal was that as an old man he might be able to minister to younger folks. When we get old, the natural thing is to cut back and take life easy. Not the writer of the psalm (look at verse 16 and ponder). The writer was old and greyheaded, but he doesn’t feel his work is done. And mine is not done, nor yours, until the Lord removes us from this earth and takes us to our heavenly home.

Brethren, there is much work for the Lord that is yet to be accomplished. Whether you are old or middle age or young, the Lord wants to use ALL of us to tell of His marvelous grace in offering salvation to the world in which we are living.

Ask the Lord to use you for His glory. Consider the truth found in Galatians 6:9, And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not.

     As my Lord gives me strength and a sound mind, I will endeavor to continue to serve Him. May that be your desire also.

Pastor

 

 

Dr. Frederick W. Carroll
Pastor

Apr 042017
 

April, 2017

Dear Friends,

Countless people over the centuries have dreamed of immortality. Many have invested their entire lives trying to leave a legacy they hoped would span the eons of time. The truth is we will all live forever. But only those who have entrusted their lives to God and experienced His forgiveness have the hope of eternal life with Christ Jesus (John 1:12; 3:16-18). His followers can look beyond the pain, suffering and hardship of earthly life because these things will all pass away with their physical bodies (I Cor. 15:35-58). Those who do not know God do not have this assurance, because when they pass from this life their troubles will linger forever (Luke 16:19-31).

But when Jesus’ followers are taken from this life, they are transformed by the same power that raised Jesus from the dead, so that they can enjoy eternity and immortality with Jesus.

A pastor in a Methodist church asked during the children’s sermon, “What happened to Jesus on Good Friday?” A little girl raised her hand and replied, “He died on the cross.” The pastor asked, “then what happened?” A little boy raised his hand and replied, “God recycled Him.”

Resurrection is really here…and now…because Christ has risen, indeed! One of the many joys of Easter is to find hope in our everyday living, even in the midst of our worries, woes, wars and weaknesses.

When we forgive others, feed the hungry, speak out about injustices, comfort the hurting, we are living the Resurrection, indeed!

When we share the joy-filled Word of hope to a friend in need, we are living the Resurrection, indeed!

When we take good care of our bodies, so that we are better able to serve others, we are living the Resurrection, indeed!

Daniel Akin, Dean of Theology at a Baptist seminary said, “When Easter is reduced to nothing more than a bunny, Easter eggs, and chocolate, we have reached a tragic day; because that is not what Easter was about to begin with and it is not what it should be about today.”

As we celebrate Easter and loudly proclaim, “Christ is risen! He is risen indeed,” remember the many resurrections in our everyday living. Live it! Celebrate it! Indeed!

Wishing you a joyful and Resurrection-centered Easter season,

 

 

Pastor Frederick W. Carroll
John 11:25 “Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection and the life: he that believeth in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live:”

Mar 012017
 

March 2017

Dear Friends.

There are a lot of changes taking place in our country since the presidential election. There are changes taking place in your families and in your personal lives. Change. The world is full of it. Someone said, “Perhaps it’s the only thing we can count on.” However, you can be sure of one thing: Our God is Unchanging. Consider God’s words in Malachi 3:6a, “For I am the Lord, I change not.” Think of where we would be if God were subject to change. It would mean that His promises were unreliable. He could decide that He no longer loves the world and reverses His promise of John 3:16. He could change His mind about our eternal security (see John 10:28).

Think with me about some of God’s attributes – and the fact that He says “I change not.” Then rejoice in the fact that we have a reliable and consistent Heavenly Father in Whom we can rest and trust.

God is a God of love, I John 4:8, 16. As a believer in Christ’s work on the cross for your sin, you are the special object of God’s love – and that will never change; praise the Lord!

God is a longsuffering Heavenly Father, Exodus 34:6, 7. Look up verse 6 and see what other characteristics are God’s. How about Psalm 86:15 “But thou, O LORD, are a God full of compassion, and gracious, longsuffering, and plenteous in mercy and truth.” How merciful and gracious and longsuffering the Lord has been with me over the years.

God is also merciful. What does Lamentations 3:22, 23 state? “It is of the Lord’s mercies that we are not consumed, because His compassions fail not. They are new every morning: great is Thy faithfulness.” So, in our churches we sing the wonderful hymn by Thomas O. Chisholm, “Great is Thy faithfulness.” Are you thankful for His mercies to you?

I mentioned John 3:16 earlier, now look at Psalm 86:5, where it states: “For thou LORD, art good, and ready to forgive.” Our Heavenly Father forgives our sin because of Christ’s work on the cross, and forgets them. In Jeremiah 31:34 the Lord says, “…for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember them no more.”

Remember: change is always for better or for worse; therefore, it is impossible for our God to change. He cannot improve or deteriorate in His deity – “…with Whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning” (James 1:17b). Since God does not change, His “…faithfulness is unto all generations…” (to you and to me) (Psalm 119:90a). How wonderful! One writer stated, “Each morning you can rely on the patience, grace, and love of God. No matter how you feel, God does not change. His faithfulness endures forever!”

Resting in my unchanging Lord,

 

 

Pastor Frederick W. Carroll
Hebrews 13:8 “Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever.”